Events

UPCOMING EVENTS

DEMO DAY 2021

Come and join us at CREATE-X Demo Day on Aug 26! This is a chance to see how the GT students, faculty, and alumni of today look to use their entrepreneurial skills to affect change in the world of tomorrow! Over 80 startups will be launching! RSVP today!


PAST EVENTS

The Debate that Changed Programming: A Living History of Computing’s Famous Collaboration

The Debate that Changed Programming: A Living History of Computing’s Famous Collaboration Thursday, June 17, 7 – 8:30 PM ET There are many inflection points in the modern history of computer science. One such moment has reverberated through the decades. Save the Date for June 17 for a living history of “The Debate that Changed Programming,” with Richard DeMillo and Dick Lipton, the men who live it.

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Global Trends in Digital Infrastructure

May 6, 1-5 pm ET DETAILS and REGISTRATION The COVID-19 pandemic has forced businesses to transform how they operate, driving extraordinary demand for digital service providers and a need for increased connectivity. Organizations that require additional infrastructure have struggled with this rapid shift in demand. This May 6, 2021 virtual event, hosted by GT CIBER, UIBS, and Equinix, will take a deep dive look at Global Trends in Digital Infrastructure with help from Senior Executives and Experts. Five trends are impacting today’s digital transformation challenges increasing the need for interconnection. Digital Business: Moving to fully digitized services is now more crucial than ever. As new demand for distributed digital engagement rises, businesses need to solve remote workforce, network efficiency, and workflow latency issues.Urbanization: Businesses need wider distribution of services to enhance local interaction. As population centers grow, businesses will have greater demands for distributed compute, and will need to manage the complexities of localization.Cybersecurity: Cyberthreats…

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Systems & Cryptography Research in Defense of Democracy

April 13, 2021 12:00 p.m | LINK Mike SpecterPh.D. candidate in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT SCP Seminal TalkPresented by the School of Cybersecurity and Privacy Abstract: In the recent U.S. primary and presidential elections, the COVID-19 pandemic forced states to prepare for the eventuality that voters would not be able to cast their ballots safely in person. As a result, many elections administrators planned to deploy commercial internet voting systems to help facilitate remote participation in the elections. While internet voting has motivated decades of research in cryptography and systems security, the design and security guarantees of the commercially-available internet voting systems were largely unknown and intentionally obfuscated.  In this talk, I will present my research which provided the first comprehensive security evaluation of the dominant internet voting systems used in U.S. federal elections. My analysis revealed that all such systems suffer from flaws that could allow attackers…

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Function Equivalence with Symbolic Execution

April 16, 2021 | 12 – 1 pm EDT | LINK Kennon BittickResearch Scientist – GTRI CIPHER Cybersecurity and Privacy Virtual Lecture SeriesCo-sponsored by the School of Cybersecurity and Privacy and the Institute for Information Security and Privacy Abstract: Summarizing and comparing basic blocks or functions across different binaries or between binary and source code has many applications for program verification including verifying compilation, source or binary transformations, identifying patched code, and identifying library functions. This talk will present IRAD research on using static symbolic execution to prove source and binary function equivalence, with a focus on how breaking up functions or basic blocks into smaller, composable units can make the analysis tractable and bypass many common issues with symbolic execution. Speaker Bio: Kennon Bittick is a research scientist in the Software Assurance branch of GTRI. He has been a key technical lead and performer on security analyses of enterprise…

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“Security as a Whole – An Overview of a Security Management Framework in Today’s Society”

April 9th, 2021 | 12:00pm – 1:00pm EDT | LINK Dr.Frederick BenabenProfesseur – IMT Mines Albi Cybersecurity Virtual Lecture SeriesCo-sponsored by the School of Cybersecurity and Privacy and the Institute for Information Security and Privacy Abstract: The consistency and the concordance of the parallel evolutions of security (as a whole) and society (as a complex system) might be questionable. Do security management practices and tools remain appropriate and efficient for our society’s insane trajectory towards hyper-density and hyper-connection? In order to explore this question, the webinar will focus on presenting a framework for characterizing and formalizing risk and security management before delivering some significant elements of our society’s evolution. By crossing the two and assessing the adequacy of security management approaches to current societal specificities, the needs and avenues of evolution of security will be put forward. The research conducted today and for more than 15 years by Frederick Benaben…

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Imagine All The People On A Trustworthy Internet

Apr. 1, 2021 12:30 p.m | LINK Marshini ChettyAssistant Professor, Department of Computer Science University of Chicago Presented By GVU Center Distinguished AlumniBrown Bag Seminar Series Abstract: Imagine a world where the Internet caters to all types of users and hosts trustworthy content. Right now, this world seems far off for many reasons. For instance, this world would require us to think more broadly of user needs beyond an `average’ tech-savvy adult user—one who is assumed to be always online with a reliable Internet connection. Moreover, this world would require us to host content that is not misleading or manipulative in some way—content that can be evaluated at face value by various users. To achieve this lofty goal, we first need to deeply understand and catalogue different types of Internet users’ needs and also develop ways to assess and make misleading online content more apparent to end-users. In this talk,…

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► VIDEO | Privacy-Preserving Approximate k-Nearest-Neighbors Search that Hides Access, Query and Volume Patterns

► VIDEO | March 26th, 2021 | 12:00pm – 1:00pm EDT Tianxin Tang,Ph.D. Candidate, Computer Science at Georgia Tech Cybersecurity Virtual Lecture SeriesCo-sponsored by the School of Cybersecurity and Privacy and the Institute for Information Security and Privacy Abstract: This talk examines the problem of privacy-preserving approximate kNN search in an outsourced environment — the client sends the encrypted data to an untrusted server and later can perform secure approximate kNN search and updates. We design a security model and propose a generic construction based on locality-sensitive hashing, symmetric encryption, and an oblivious man. The construction provides very strong security guarantees, not only hiding the information about the data, but also the access, query, and volume patterns.  Speaker Bio: Tianxin Tang is a Ph.D. candidate in Computer Science. She is interested in privacy-preserving techniques from the provable-security perspective, and her research primarily focuses on encrypted databases.

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Safeguarding IoT Protocols: New Challenges and Verifiable Solutions

Mar. 25, 2021 | 1 pm EDT | LINK Luyi Xing, Indiana University Bloomington SCP Seminal TalkPresented by the School of Cybersecurity and Privacy Title: Safeguarding IoT Protocols: New Challenges and Verifiable Solutions Abstract: The cloud-centered IoT infrastructure has emerged to help IoT manufacturers connect their devices to their users. In the infrastructure, IoT protocols determine how IoT devices communicate with users and how they are access-controlled. However, IoT protocols come with fundamental security challenges, and can hardly guide the implementation of trusted IoT systems. In this talk, I will introduce the latest security analysis on IoT protocols in the context of real-world systems, and new insights and techniques to safeguard IoT systems.  Bio: Luyi Xing is an Assistant Professor of Computer Science at Indiana University Bloomington. Before joining IU, he worked for three years in the industry, focusing on engineering large, distributed systems at AWS, Amazon. His primary research interest is…

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Vaccine Passports, COVID Surveillance, and Social Justice

March 24th, 2021 | 11:00am – 12:15pm EDT | RegisterSponsored by ETHIC Georgia Tech Ethics, Technology, and Human Interaction Center Invited Panelists Effy VayenaSwiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zürich (ETH Zürich) Joseph AJoseph AliJohns Hopkins University Moderators Justin Biddle (GT Public Policy) and Nassim Parvin (GT LMC ) Abstract: The COVID-19 pandemic has led to transformations in technologies for public health surveillance. These include the emergence of vaccine passports, which certify vaccination status and structure access to societal goods, and digital tools for tracking individuals who test positive for the virus or come in contact with someone who tests positive. Many discussions of the ethics of surveillance technologies focus on privacy issues — which are, indeed, important. However, public health surveillance tools raise a host of additional ethical and social justice issues including disparity in access to services, racial and economic discrimination, global inequality, governance and accountability, and individual…

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► VIDEO | “Applying Deep Reinforcement Learning (DRL) in a Cyber Wargaming Engine”

► VIDEO | March 19th, 2021 | 12:00pm – 1:00pm EDT Ambrose Kam,Chief Engineer, Cyber Innovations at Lockheed Martin Virtual Cybersecurity Lecture SeriesCo-sponsored by the School of Cybersecurity and Privacy and the Institute for Information Security and Privacy Abstract: Cybersecurity is inherently complicated due to the dynamic nature of the threats and ever-expanding attack surfaces. Ironically, this challenge is exacerbated by the rapid advancement of many new technologies like Internet of Things (IoT) devices, 5G infrastructure, cloud-based computing, etc. This is where artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (ML) techniques can be called into service, and provide potential solutions in terms of threat detection and mitigation responses in a rapidly changing environment. Contrarily humans are often limited by their innate inability to process information and fail to recognize/respond to attack patterns in the multi-dimensional, multi-faceted world. The recent DARPA AlphaDogFight has proven machines can defeat even the best human pilot in…

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John P. Imlay Jr. Series on Entrepreneurship: Fireside Chat with Georgia Tech alumni Mark Buffington (BS MGT ’93) and Paul Judge (PhD CS ’02)

Time: Thursday, March 18, 2021 7PM EST Presented by The College of Computing REGISTER NOW Georgia Tech’s College of Computing is home to a thriving startup culture that embraces those not content with just having a good idea. This entrepreneurial spirit is embodied in the College’s students, alumni, and faculty who have turned scores of good ideas into successful business ventures.To highlight these entrepreneurs and inspire those that follow, GT Computing has established the John P. Imlay Jr. Series on Entrepreneurship. This series began in 2019 with profiles of GT Computing students, alumni, and faculty that are shaping the College’s entrepreneurial culture. In fall 2020, we expanded the initiative to include a monthly speaker series.We invite you to join us on Thursday, March 18 at 7pm EST for a fireside chat with Georgia Tech alumni Mark Buffington (BS MGT ’93) and Paul Judge (PhD CS ’02) of Panoramic Ventures. Paul has been…

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Bridging the Theory and Practice of Cryptography

Mar. 18, 2021 | 12 pm EDT | LINK | Joseph Jaeger,University of Washington SCP Seminal TalkPresented by the School of Cybersecurity and Privacy Title: Bridging the Theory and Practice of Cryptography Abstract: Cryptography is deployed at scale to protect data, both in transit and at rest. However, protocols are often designed or even deployed aiming for security that extends beyond what is formally understood. This talk will cover my efforts to narrow this gap and to provide protocols that are both practical and provably secure.In my talk I will showcase examples of this from my recent and ongoing research, including how the use of cryptography at scale (e.g. in encrypted messaging apps such as WhatsApp) required new models to address unique threats and how a better understanding of the power of computational resources used by attackers (e.g. computation time and memory usage) enabled me to prove stronger security guarantees…

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► VIDEO | Building a Strategic Blueprint for Cybersecurity and Privacy Education

► VIDEO | March 17, 2021 3:00 – 4:30 pm Add to: Google Calendar | Outlook | iCal File Please join us for Building a Strategic Blueprint for Cybersecurity and Privacy Education Workshop, the first of a series of workshops hosted by the Georgia Cybersecurity and Privacy Roadmap Taskforce (GCRT).  The Georgia Cybersecurity and Privacy Roadmap Taskforce (GCRT) is a statewide initiative to address Georgia’s challenge to produce enough qualified cyber-science and privacy professionals to fill the growing number of critical cybersecurity jobs within the state and close the workforce gap. The GCRT was set up to create and execute a strategic action plan that can inform and be implemented collaboratively across public and private education systems, including K-12, technical colleges, and university programs. Building a Strategic Blueprint for Cybersecurity and Privacy Education Workshop Date: Wednesday, March 17, 2021Time: 3 – 4:30 p.m. VIDEO RECORDING Hosted by:Richard DeMillo, Chair, Georgia Cybersecurity and Privacy Roadmap Taskforce (GCRT); Professor and Interim Chair, School of Cybersecurity and Privacy,…

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Towards data-driven Internet infrastructure security

Mar. 16, 2021 | 1 pm EDT | LINK | Cecilia Testart, Massachusetts Institute of Technology SCP Seminal TalkPresented by the School of Cybersecurity and Privacy and the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering Title: Towards data-driven Internet infrastructure security Abstract: The Internet infrastructure is critical for online daily life. However, key Internet protocols were not designed to cope with untrustworthy parties, making them vulnerable to misconfigurations and attacks from anywhere in the network. Despite the many proposals by the research community and standardization organizations (IETF) to increase security, little has changed in operational environments. We lack sufficient empirical evidence and the problem space is complex: it involves multiple stakeholders, with different interests and resources, as well as geopolitical challenges. In this talk, I will focus on the Border Gateway Protocol (BGP), the Internet global routing protocol. I will present an evidence-based, data-driven approach that advances our understanding of harms linked to…

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► VIDEO | “Creating, Weaponizing, and Detecting Deep Fakes”

► VIDEO | Friday, March 12th, 2021 | 12:00pm – 1:00pm  Hany FaridProfessor, University of California, Berkeley  Cybersecurity Lecture SeriesPresented by the School of Cybersecurity and Privacy and the Institute for Information Security and Privacy  Abstract: The past few years have seen a startling and troubling rise in the fake-news phenomena in which everyone from individuals to nation-sponsored entities can produce and distribute misinformation. The implications of fake news range from a misinformed public to an existential threat to democracy, and horrific violence. At the same time, recent and rapid advances in machine learning are making it easier than ever to create sophisticated and compelling fake images. videos, and audio recordings, making the fake-news phenomena even more powerful and dangerous. I will provide an overview of the creation of these so-called deep-fakes, and I will describe emerging techniques for detecting them. Speaker Bio: Hany Farid is a Professor at the University of…

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Age of Deception: Intelligence and Cybersecurity in International Relations

Mar. 11, 2021 | 12 pm EDT | LINK | Jon R. Lindsay, University of Toronto SCP Seminal TalkPresented by the School of Cybersecurity and Privacy Title: Toward Automatically Evaluating Security Risks and Providing Cyber Threat Intelligence Abstract: This talk will provide an overview of a book project in progress entitled, Age of Deception. The book attempts to synthesize a decade of cyber research by arguing that cyber conflict is helpfully understood as intelligence by other means. I will unpack this claim by building on the information practice framework presented in my previous book, Information Technology and Military Power. Intelligence practice is distinguished from other forms of information practice by its reliance on deception and exploitation of common institutions and infrastructures to gain a competitive advantage. Cyberspace is the most complex sociotechnical information system ever built, and cyber conflict is essentially just intelligence competition within it. Yet intelligence as such has become digitized,…

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Event: 21st-Century Cybersecurity: The Critical Role of Critical Languages in Advancing Multilingual and Cross-cultural National Security Approaches, Competencies, and Perspectives

Date(s): March 11, 2021, 9:30 am – 11:00 am Location: Online Cost: Free but registration is needed Atlanta Global Studies Center (AGSC) Collaboratorium series – Spring 2021 21st-Century Cybersecurity: The Critical Role of Critical Languages in Advancing Multilingual and Cross-cultural National Security Approaches, Competencies, and Perspectives Virtual event – REGISTER HERE Synopsis:Featuring Dr. Mike Nugent, Director of the Defense Language and National Security Education Office (DLNSEO), this panel examines opportunities for innovation and impact in the national security environment leveraging cross-cultural expertise and languages critical to national defense* to foster education and research about cyber security and privacy. Recognizing that successful cyber security and privacy studies in the 21st century must be a multilingual and multicultural space, the event also contextualizes Georgia Tech’s unique interdisciplinary strengths as a STEM-driven institution with nationally recognized language programs and recently founded School of Cybersecurity and Privacy. Topics addressed include The future of cyber security in a…

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Toward Automatically Evaluating Security Risks and Providing Cyber Threat Intelligence

Mar. 9, 2021 | 12 pm EDT | LINK | Xiaojing Liao, Indiana University Bloomington SCP Seminal TalkPresented by the School of Cybersecurity and Privacy Title: Toward Automatically Evaluating Security Risks and Providing Cyber Threat Intelligence Abstract: Program security analysis has been studied for decades. Various techniques, such as fuzzing, taint analysis, symbolic execution, have demonstrated their successes in vulnerability assessment. Today, theavailability of a large amount of program semantic data (e.g., manuals, developer documentation, related web content), and the advance of artificial intelligence technologies make it increasingly feasible to simulate human intelligence in understanding program semantics to discover software vulnerability automatically. In this talk, I will discuss my research toward in-depth and systematic semantic supports for automatic vulnerability assessment. Particularly, I will focus on two systems — Advance and Dilution — which automatically analyzes the developer’s guide to infer potential security flaws and API misuse, respectively. Bio: Xiaojing Liao is an Assistant Professor in the Department…

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► VIDEO | “War by Other Means”

► VIDEO | Friday, March 5th, 2021 | 12:00pm – 1:00pm Harri HurstiCo-founder Nordic Innovation Labs   Cybersecurity Lecture SeriesPresented by the School of Cybersecurity and Privacy and the Institute for Information Security and Privacy  Abstract: Critical infrastructure, elections, and businesses are facing new trends of attacks. This talk discusses targets and TTP (Tactics, Techniques, and Procedures) of 2020 and explores what to expect for 2021. Speaker Bio: Mr. Hursti is considered one of the world’s foremost experts on the topic of electronic voting and critical infrastructure security, having served in all aspects of the industry sector. He is considered an authority on uncovering critical problems in electronic voting systems worldwide. In the last 15 years, Mr. Hursti has pursued this important area out of a sense of duty to his fellow citizens of the world, here are several of his critical findings and projects.

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► VIDEO | “Recent Insights from Analysis Users’ Web Browsing Behavior”

► VIDEO | Friday, February 26th, 2021 | 12:00pm – 1:00pm | Yuliia Lut Ph.D. Candidate, Columbia University  Cybersecurity Lecture SeriesPresented by the School of Cybersecurity and Privacy,and the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering Abstract: Accurately analyzing and modeling online browsing behavior plays a key role in understanding users and technology interactions. Specifically, understanding whether users have correct perceptions of their browsing behavior will help to identify key features for models of user behavior, which will, in turn, enable realistic-looking synthetic data generation. In this work, we designed and conducted a user experiment to collect browsing behavior data from 32 participants continuously for 14 days. The collected dataset includes URLs of visited websites, actions taken on each website (such as clicking links or typing in a textbox), and timestamps of all activities. Finally, we use this new dataset to empirically address the following questions: (1) Do people have correct perceptions of their…

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► VIDEO |Detecting and Investigating System Intrusions with Provenance Analytics

► VIDEO| February 25, 2021 | 11AM EDT Wajih Hassan,University of Illinois Abstract: Data provenance describes the detailed history of system execution, allowing us to understand how system objects came to exist in their present state and providing means to identify the root cause of system intrusions. My research leverages provenance analytics to empower system defenders to quickly and effectively detect and investigate malicious behaviors. In this talk, I will first present a provenance-based solution for combating the “Threat Alert Fatigue” problem that currently plagues enterprise security. Next, I will describe an approach for performing accurate and high-fidelity attack forensics using a novel adaptation of program analysis techniques. I will conclude by discussing the promise of provenance analytics to address open security and auditing problems in complex computing systems and emerging technologies. Stories of devastating data breaches continue to dominate headlines around the world. Equifax, Target, and Office of Personnel…

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► VIDEO | The First Cyber Campaign: Bletchley Park and the ‘Extraordinary’ Conditions for Intelligence Success

► VIDEO | February 24, 2021 12 p.m. EDT Jon Lindsay, University of Toronto Cosponsored by the School of History and Sociology and the School of Cybersecurity and Privacy Abstract: There is a huge literature about Bletchley Park, one of the most stunning success stories in intelligence history. Yet questions remain about how to explain the extent and persistence of British signals intelligence success. This case takes on renewed importance in an era of endemic cyber conflict. Indeed, the cryptologic contest of World War II, a duel between encryption and decryption machines, might be described as the first cyber conflict. This essay develops a practice-based account of the exploitation and protection of the human and machine performances that facilitate organizational control. I infer three necessary but hard to meet conditions for intelligence success and show how Bletchley park met all three of them. First, shared sociotechnical protocols for communication and…

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Security and Privacy of Internet Voting in U.S. Elections

Feb. 19, 2021 | 12 pm EDT | LINK | Michael A. Specter, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Cybersecurity Lecture SeriesPresented by the Institute for Information Security and Privacy and the School of Cybersecurity and Privacy Abstract: Election security is ​hard​–elections themselves are complex socio-technical systems that encompass cryptography, systems security, and public policy. Providing a transparent, safe, and private voting system remains a complicated problem, motivating a number of research papers in both cryptography and systems security. Unfortunately, COVID-19, overseas voters, and accessibility concerns have forced the U.S. States to increasingly turn to untested forms of Internet voting to facilitate remote participation. Despite these systems’ newfound importance to the democratic process, there has been little public documentation on their security and privacy properties, a problem worsened by voting system vendors’ record of hostility toward independent security research. In this talk, Specter will present his research evaluating the security of the dominant…

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Provably Secure Indistinguishability Obfuscation

February 16, 2021, 11 am EDT | Virtual Talk LINK Aayush Jain University of California, Los Angeles Presented by the School of Cybersecurity and Privacy and the School of Computer Science Abstract: In this talk, we will cover some exciting progress on the problem of Indistinguishability Obfuscation (proposed by Barak et. al. 2001). In a nutshell, an Indistinguishability Obfuscation scheme is an efficient compiler that takes as input a program and outputs a new program with the same input-behavior and only a polynomial slowdown, but in addition, we have the guarantee that the new program reveals minimal information about the original program.  If realized securely and efficiently, such an obfuscation scheme would have huge consequences to both theory and practice. However, until now we did not know if it exists under any reasonably well-believed conjecture. Our work places iO onto “terra-firma”, by giving a construction that is as secure as several…

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► VIDEO | To Err.Is Human: Characterizing the Threat of Unintended URLs in Social Media

► VIDEO | February 12, 2021, 12 pm EDT Beliz KaleliPh.D. Researcher, Boston University Abstract   To make their services more user friendly, online social media platforms automatically identify text that corresponds to URLs and render it as clickable links. In this paper, we show that the techniques used by such services to recognize URLs are often too permissive and can result in unintended URLs being displayed in social network messages. Among others, we show that popular platforms (such as Twitter) will render text as a clickable URL if a user forgets a space after a full stop at the end of a sentence, and the first word of the next sentence happens to be a valid Top Level Domain. Attackers can take advantage of these unintended URLs by registering the corresponding domains and exposing millions of Twitter users to arbitrary malicious content. To characterize the threat that unintended URLs…

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► VIDEO | Foundations of Blockchain Systems

► VIDEO | February 11, 2021, 12 pm EDT | Julian LossUniversity of Maryland Abstract: One of the most successful applications of modern cryptography has been its use in electronic and digital payment systems. In traditional systems, a trusted authority handles all payments (e.g., a bank or a credit card company). More recently, blockchain systems have emerged as a trust-free and increasingly popular alternative. In a blockchain system, users jointly emulate the trusted authority by running a distributed protocol to agree on the transaction history of users (i.e., the blockchain). Making blockchain systems a secure and scalable environment poses many new and fascinating challenges that require solutions from both cryptography and distributed computing. In my talk, I will explain the different areas of my research and their importance as components that make up a blockchain system. For each of these areas, I will also list some of the open questions that…

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► VIDEO | Zero-Knowledge for Everything and Everyone

► VIDEO | February 5, 2021, 12 pm EDT Presented by, David HeathPh.D. Researcher, Georgia Tech Abstract   Zero-Knowledge (ZK) Proofs are important cryptographic objects that allow an untrusted prover to demonstrate to an untrusted verifier the truth of some statement while revealing nothing additional. ZK can potentially be used for complex applications, such as allowing a company to securely conduct an external audit of its records or allowing a code bounty hunter to prove the existence of a software bug without directly showing the vulnerability. Unfortunately, complex ZK applications are difficult to build in practice; existing ZK protocols require statements to be encoded as circuits, and it is difficult to express complex statements as simple circuits. To bring complex ZK applications to practice, developers need a more expressive design language.  Rather than providing a new design language, we provide an infrastructure that allows existing languages to run in ZK. In…

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► VIDEO | Discovering Ad-driven Social Engineering Campaigns at Scale

► VIDEO | January 29, 2021, 12 pm EDT Presented by Phani VadrevuAssistant Professor, University of New Orleans Abstract   Malicious ads often use social engineering (SE) tactics to coax users into downloading unwanted software, purchasing fake products or services, or giving up valuable personal information. These ads are often served by low-tier ad networks that may not have the technical means (or simply the will) to patrol the ad content they serve to curtail abuse. This lecture will describe a system for large-scale automatic discovery and tracking of SE Attack Campaigns delivered via Malicious Advertisements (SEACMA). The system aims to be generic, allowing us to study the SEACMA ad distribution problem without being biased towards specific categories of ad-publishing websites or SE attacks. Professor Vadrevu will share thoughts on methods to find potential research ideas to focus on in the area of social engineering and web security drawing from personal…

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Grid Cybersecurity Strategy in an Attacker-Defender Model

January 22, 2021, 12 pm EDT | Virtual Talk LINK Presented by, Yu-Cheng ChenPh.D. student at Georgia Institute of Technology in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering Abstract   With enough computing power and time, an attacker can figure out a password or secret key. This talk addresses modeling the behavior of the attacker and the defender in order to analyze the evolution of cyber-attacks. Chen will introduce an approach that can help cyber-security managers optimize their defense strategies. The analysis provides mathematical proofs and insight into when access controls (such as passwords, internet protocol addresses, and session keys) should be reset to minimize the probability of a successful attack.  Speaker Bio Yu-Cheng Chen is a 5th year Ph.D. student at Georgia Institute of Technology in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering. He graduated from the University of Washington with a double Bachelor’s Degree in Electrical Engineering and Computer…

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Securing Democracy in the Fourth Industrial Revolution

January 15, 2021, 12 pm EDT | Virtual Talk LINK Presented by, L. Jason AnastasopoulosAssistant Professor in Public Administration and Policy and Political Science at the University of Georgia AbstractIn this talk I will be discussing some of my research which focuses on designing systems needed to secure democracy and democratic political institutions, such as elections, in the interconnected digital world of the “fourth industrial revolution.”  Speaker BioJason is an upcoming fellow at the Safra Center for Ethics at Harvard University and an Assistant Professor at the School of Public and International Affairs, the Department of Statistics (by courtesy) and the Institute for Artificial Intelligence at the University of Georgia. was also recently selected to serve as the Microsoft Visiting Professor of Information Technology Policy at Princeton University. His research uses behavioral and institutional approaches to understand the threats that emerging technologies pose to democratic institutions, international security and international…

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► VIDEO | 2020 PIT / UN CONVENING | ELECTION SECURITY

► VIDEO | Dec. 2, 2020 | The election may be over, but its shadow still remains. For the last year election security has been a leading concern for governments and constituents. PIT practitioners have been right in the thick of it, working to stanch disinformation, protect voting infrastructure, and make the path to the polls easier. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V3pcFrQSa-Y&t=169s Our speakers will discuss the role of PIT in election security – what we’ve learned during this election cycle, and how we can use the information in the future. Moderator: Maurice Turner, Election Security Expert Speakers: Bruce Schneier, Fellow & Adjunct Lecturer in Public Policy, Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government Richard DeMillo, Chair, School of Cybersecurity and Privacy, Charlotte B. and Roger C. Warren Professor of Computing, Georgia Tech; Jake Braun, Executive Director Cyber Policy Initiative, Harris School of Public Policy, University of Chicago; Robin Carnahan, Fellow, Beeck Center for Social Impact…

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► VIDEO | GT Computing Fireside Chat: Rich DeMillo hosts Kabir Barday

► VIDEO | Nov. 19, 2020 | As part of a new entrepreneurship initiative, the College of Computing is hosting a monthly virtual speaker series with various alumni and faculty around different topics. Rich DeMillo, chair of the School of Cybersecurity and Privacy, will host a fireside chat on entrepreneurship and cybersecurity with Kabir Barday, CS 09, founder and CEO of OneTrust on Nov. 19, 7 p.m. EDT. The talks are open for GT Computing students and alumni to participate, and start with a fireside chat followed by audience Q&A.

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